Our Healthy Living Center is designed to help you find information concerning specific and common medical and health issues.   We have general diabetes information and links to more resources,  a variety of health diets you can access, as well as a host of downloadable handouts about various medical diseases and concerns.  Also, be sure to check  out our Healthy Living Center weight loss program. Visit our official site at www.hlcnorfolk.com

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Diets

Why is a Low Sodium Diet Important?

article-new_ds-photo_getty_article_154_4_86495796_XSA low-sodium (salt) diet may help lower blood pressure and prevent build-up of extra water in your body. This diet can help those with high blood pressure, heart failure, kidney disease, or other conditions in which swelling or fluid retention can occur. Even if you take a pill for blood pressure or a water pill (diuretic) to remove fluid, it is still important to have less salt in your diet. Our recommendation is to limit your daily sodium intake to 1,500mg (ie. 300-400 per meal)

Low Sodium Dieting

The typical American diet is very high in sodium. Even if you do not add salt while cooking or do not use the salt shaker at the table, you are probably eating too much sodium. That is because we eat processed foods, like frozen dinners, fast foods, boxed noodle rice dishes, canned soups, and canned vegetables. Most processed foods are high in sodium so avoid those as much as possible.

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It may take some time to adjust to a low sodium-diet, but it is worth the effort. A low-sodium diet can help you feel better and may even keep you out of the hospital.  To help you, here are a list of foods and their sodium contents.

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No-SaltGeneral Guidelines For Cutting Down On Salt

Eliminate salty foods from your diet and reduce the amount of salt used in cooking. Sea salt is no better than regular salt. Choose low sodium foods. Many salt-free or reduced salt products are available. When reading food labels, low sodium is defined as 140mg of sodium per serving, 400mg or more is high. Be creative and season your foods with spices, herbs, lemon, garlic, ginger, vinegar and pepper.

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For more info (click here)

Why a Low Cholesterol Low Fat Diet is Important?

Most Americans with high cholesterol don’t even realize it until its too late. They often feel just fine until the first sign of trouble…a heart attack! That’s why its important avoid foods high in saturated fats and cholesterol. lower-cholesterolHigh cholesterol and lipids (fats) are associated with the build up of plaque in the arteries of the body that can reduce blood flow to the heart or head. This may lead to cardiovascular (heart) disease and stroke. By following a diet with less total fat, low saturated fat, and low-cholesterol, you can help control your blood cholesterol and reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke.

How To Lower Your Cholesterol

Three major dietary factors that contribute to high levels of serum cholesterol, including LDL cholesterol are: (1) high intake of saturated fat; (2) high intake of dietary cholesterol; and (3) an imbalance between calorie intake and activity level leading to obesity. Individuals with high triglycerides may also need to reduce foods high in sugar or refined carbohydrate, and avoid alcohol. A high serum level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) “good” cholesterol is associated with a decreased risk of heard disease.  Here is a chart to help guide your eating habits…

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A family history of heart disease, a diet high in saturated fat and cholesterol, smoking, lack of exercise and obesity can all contribute to your risk of hardening of the arteries. Take care of yourself. Take care of your heart. …It’s the only one you have…

For more information (click here)

Iron-are-you-getting-enough

Why Is Iron Important?

Iron is a part of the blood-oxygen delivery system, and without proper levels of iron, you may begin to feel the weakening effects of low iron; tired all of the time, pale, listless and irritable.

Each and every cell in your body needs oxygen to produce energy. Not just for exercise, but for everyday life: brushing your teeth energy, walking up the stairs energy, going to work energy, baking cookies energy.0810HEA-iron

When you have normal iron levels, you have enough energy in every one of your body cells. Without enough iron, your cells produce less energy.

Where can I get Iron?

You get iron from a number of foods. There are 2 types of iron in our diet:

Heme Iron is found in animal products such as red meat, fish, and poultry.

heme-ironNon-Heme Iron is found in plant products such as grains, nuts, beans, veggies, and fruit.

nonheme

Heme iron is absorbed better than non-heme iron, so it is best to eat non-heme iron with heme iron to increase absorption. If you do not eat animal products, you will need to eat twice as much non-heme iron rich foods. Also including a source of vitamin C with your meals will help absorption (ie. Orange juice, Grapefruit, Potatoes, Broccoli).

*Coffee & Tea decrease iron absorption so drink at least one hour before or after an iron rich meal*

For more info… (click here)

Potassium is a mineral found naturally in many foods and in your body. Potassium-rich foods will help maintain your blood potassium levels, a factor which controls many body functions. Potassium-rich foods may be needed if you are taking certain medications such as some types of diuretics (water pills), or if you have a medical condition that is causing you to need extra potassium. Taking in more potassium may help lower high blood pressure. The potassium level in your blood should be watched closely by your Doctor. Although fruits and vegetable tend to contain the most potassium, listed below are other examples of foods that contain large amounts of potassium.

Steps You Can Take to Increase Potassium in Your Diet

To increase the potassium in your diet, try to eat at least 2 high and 2 medium potassium fruits along with 1 medium potassium vegetable each day (see attached food lists). Eat whole grain breads more often. Consult your Doctor or Dietitian before using a potassium-containing salt substitute.Potassium content of the potato compared

Recommended Daily Intake

Men & Women              Women (specifically)

1-3yrs 3000mg/d            Pregnancy 4700mg/d 4-8yrs 3800mg/d            Lactation 5100mg/d 9-13yr 4500mg/d 14-70yr 4700mg/d

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For more info… (click here)

Purine (Gout) Diet

Gout Diet Treatment.  What is it?

A low purine diet means eating foods that do not have many purines in them.  Purines can be found in some foods and make up 15% of the uric acids found in the body.  Uric acid comes from the breakdown of purines.  the body does not use uric acid so it is usually filtered by the kidneys and taken out in the urine.  When uric acid builds up in the body, it can cause pain and swelling known as gout.  It may also cause kidney stones.  You may need to follow this low purine diet if you have these problems.

Care

Gout is often treated with medicines that help the body get rid of extra uric acid.  But, eating the right foods can help limit the amount of purines in your body.  This will lessen the amount of uric acid in your body.

How Should I Be Eating?272197-755-18

Eat a diet that has at least 50% of calories as carbohydrates. Do this by eating 6 to 10 servings of bread or starchy foods, and 5 fruits and vegetables each day.

Also eat a low fat diet to limit your fat intake to 30% or less of your total calories. Ask your caregiver for information about following a low fat diet.

Do NOT drink alcohol unless OK’d by your caregiver. Alcohol can cause gout too.

4787919_f520Group I: (Green) Eat or drink the foods listed in Group I (green) as often as you like while following an eating plan to stay at a good body weight.

Group II: (Yellow) Eat only 1 serving per day of these foods when your gout is under control. Avoid them when your gout is flaring up. A serving of meat, fish, or poultry is 2 to 3 ounces cooked. A serving of vegetables is ½ cup. A serving of liquids is 1 cup

Group III: (Pink) Avoid these foods at all times.

For more info… (click here)

Calcium & Vitamin D Diet

For a lifetime of Strong, Healthy Bones

Bones perform a variety of functions in the body.  Bones provide structure, protect vital organs and store calcium.  Adequate calcium and vitamin D are essential to optimize bone health.  Calcium plays an important role in maintaining bone, while vitamin D is necessary for the body to absorb calcium.  It is important to include both in your diet an dthe amount you need varies by age.

bonemilkHow much do you need?

Age     Calcium (mg)     Vit. D (IU) 1-50      1,000 mg             400 IU 51+        1,200 mg          400-800 IU

Where to get it?

Calcium is found in a variety of foods, including dairy products, vegetables, and beans.  Many foods like cereals, juices and breads have calcium added to them.  When eating packaged food, read the nutrition label to determine how much calcium the food contains.

calciumchartVitamin D is found in some types of fish and is also added to foods such as milk, cereal and some juices.   But, a well-balanced diet alone may not provide with the calcium or Vitamin D you need. pillsDietary sources of vitamin D are limited, so supplements like multivitamins, or calcium tablets with vitamin D can make the difference.

For more info… (click here)

Diabetes Health

  • Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into  energy needed for daily life. The cause of diabetes is a mystery, although both genetics and environmental factors such as obesity and lack of exercise appear to play key roles.
  • There are three types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 & Gestational Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes is a disease that starts when the pancreas stops making insulin. Insulin lets blood sugar—also called glucose—enter the body’s cells to be used for energy. Without insulin, the cells can’t get the sugar they need, and too much sugar builds up in the blood. Type 2 Diabetes is a lifelong disease that happens when the cells of the body can’t use insulin the right way or when the pancreas can’t make enough insulin. Insulin lets blood sugar—also called glucose—enter the body’s cells to be used for energy. When insulin is not able to do its job, the cells can’t get the sugar they need, and too much sugar builds up in the blood. Over time, this extra sugar in the blood can damage your eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. Gestational Diabetes is a temporary form of insulin resistance that usually occurs halfway through a pregnancy as a result of excessive hormone production in the body, or the pancreas’ inability to make the additional insulin that is needed during some pregnancies in women without a previous history of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after pregnancy, but women who have had gestational diabetes are at an increased risk for later developing type 2 diabetes.

hlsDo You Have Diabetes? Want to Learn How to Understand and Control it Better?

At the Healthy Living Center we offer intense diabetes education and training.

We understand that diabetes is the most harmful disorder to the body and the most difficult to understand. 1 out of every 4 Americans over age 65 have diabetes and of that number African-Americans comprise the most. The rise in diabetes is so great that by year 2030, it is estimated that 2 out of every 4 Americans over age 65 will have it and 1 out of every 2 African-Americans will have it. To treat Diabetes requires not only your medical provider’s expertise but your willingness to actively participate in your own care. At the Healthy Living Center, we give you the tools and knowledge to take control of your life with this disease.

 

Don’t let diabetes ruin your life! Fight back with knowledge and understanding.

 

Education Session Format

Our education session lasts approx 2 hours.

First you will undergo a brief physical exam that focuses on the key body sites that diabetes attacks.

Second, you will tour our Healthy Living Center where a chef will have a diabetic friendly meal prepared for your enjoyment. It will also serve as an example that diabetic food choices can be extremely tasty.

Third, you will be given a 30 minute power point presentation about diabetes from a medical provider with ample time for questions. You will learn about the nuts & bolts of diabetes in clear and simple terms. You will learn some of the terminology and test results that are used during your office visits.

Fourth, you will be counseled by a certified diabetic educator to help you to understand why some foods are bad for diabetes and how to select healthier choices. You will learn how to read food labels, calculate calories and sodium in the foods you eat.

Lastly, you will undergo a review of glucose home monitoring. Your will be shown how to use a monitor if you do not already know. You will be taught the preferred methods of testing yourself. You will be shown how to record your results in a daily log and how to interpret your glucose results. For those needing it, insulin administration will also be reviewed and taught.

Testimonials

What Is The Cost?

nurseThe cost is covered by your insurance plan just like an office visit. If your are interested, let our staff or your health provider know.

Olivia Newby, DNP, FNP-BC, CDE (Program Coordinator & Nurse Practitioner)

James Newby, MD, CDE (Program Physician)cde

DEAP

 

 

 

Fasting glucose should be 70-130 2 hours after eating the glucose should be under 180 Bedtime glucose should be 90-150.

• The A1C test measures your average blood glucose control for the past 3 months. It should be 7.0 or lower for good diabetes control
• It is determined by measuring the percentage of glycosylated hemoglobin, or HbA1c, in the blood.
• Your A1C should be tested 2-4 times a year..
• It does not replace daily self-testing of blood glucose.
• The results give you a good idea of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working.

Heart disease and stroke Approximately 65 percent of people with diabetes will die of heart disease or stroke, and they are likely to die at a younger age than people who do not have diabetes. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to suffer a stroke.

Blindness due to diabetic retinopathy Diabetes is the leading cause of new blindness in people 20 to 74 years of age.

Kidney disease due to diabetic nephropathy Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (kidney failure). Kidney failure requires the patient to undergo dialysis or a kidney transplant in order to live.

Nerve disease and amputations About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of diabetes-related nerve damage, which can lead to lower limb amputations. In fact, diabetes is the most frequent cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations. The risk of a leg amputation is 15 to 40 times greater for a person with diabetes.

Impotence due to diabetic neuropathy or blood vessel blockage Impotence is a common complication of diabetes in men. It has been reported that men with diabetes, over the age of 50 have impotence rates as high as 50 to 60 percent.

Carbohydrates have a greater impact on blood sugar or glucose than even fats and protein. Diabetics should ensure no more than 40 to 65 percent of their daily caloric intake comes from carbohydrates and ensure that most of this comes from good carbs like vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans. Simple carbohydrates or sugars are bad carbs that can increase blood glucose levels quickly.

What are carbs?

Your body uses carbohydrates to make glucose (sugar) which is the fuel that gives you energy and helps keep everything going.  Your body can use glucose immediately or store it in your liver and muscles for when it is needed.  You can find carbohydrates in the following:  fruits, vegetables, breads (cereals, and other grains), milk (and milk products),  foods containing added sugars such as cakes, cookies, and sugar-sweetened beverages.

Healthier foods that are higher in carbohydrates include ones that provide dietary fiber and whole grains as well as those without added sugars.

There are two main types of carbohydrates:

–             Simple carbohydrates (less healthy)

–             Complex carbohydrates (more healthy)

What are simple carbohydrates?

Simple carbohydrates are digested quickly.  This is why they are used for quick energy.  The digestive enzymes easily break down these molecules for absorption.  Their rapid absorption increases the chances of sugar converting to fat .  Examples include white bread, white rice, refined sugars (white sugar, cookies, candy, jelly), most packaged cereals, pasta (white flour), sodas, soft drinks and chocolate.

What are complex carbohydrates?

Complex carbohydrates are harder to digest.  Digestive enzymes have to work much harder to break them down for absorption through the intestines.  For this reason digestion of complex carbohydrates takes longer. The slow absorption of these sugars provide us with a steady supply of energy and limits the amount of sugar converted into fat and stored.  Examples include whole grain bread, brown rice, unrefined sugars, (whole cane or raw sugar), oatmeal, potatoes, most fruits, corn and rice.

Try to replace simple carbohydrates with complex carbohydrates.

All carbs can contribute to weight gain and worsening control of diabetes, but eating simple carbohydrates make you much more prone. to this bad consequence.

What are fats?

Fats are nutrients that are water insoluble and supply the body with energy.  They are needed for important bodily functions.  However too much fat consumption can lead to poor control of diabetes and to the development of cardiovascular disease.  There are several types of fats:  polyunsaturated fats, monounsaturated fats, saturated fats and trans fats.

Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated ( the “good” fats).

Found in nut and vegetable oils and oily fish, such as salmon, trout, and herring. They don’t raise blood cholesterol levels and may even reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems. Eating seafood with omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon and sardines, twice a week may reduce the risk of certain forms of heart disease.

Saturated and trans fats (the “bad” fats)

Found in dairy and beef products and palm and coconut oils. The more of them you eat, the higher your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Trans fats are also found in French fries and many commercially baked products, such as cookies and crackers, but are becoming less common.

Examples of good oils:   Olive oil (best), Canola oil (next best), Peanut oil (good), Vegetable oil (least)

Examples of bad oils:  Coconut oil, Palm oil, All animal based oil such as lard and bacon grease.

Go to this link for morewww.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/

Carbohydrates have a greater impact on blood sugar or glucose than even fats and protein. Diabetics should ensure no more than 40 to 65 percent of their daily caloric intake comes from carbohydrates and ensure that most of this comes from good carbs like vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans. Simple carbohydrates or sugars are bad carbs that can increase blood glucose levels quickly.

What are carbs?

Your body uses carbohydrates to make glucose (sugar) which is the fuel that gives you energy and helps keep everything going.  Your body can use glucose immediately or store it in your liver and muscles for when it is needed.  You can find carbohydrates in the following:  fruits, vegetables, breads (cereals, and other grains), milk (and milk products),  foods containing added sugars such as cakes, cookies, and sugar-sweetened beverages.

Healthier foods that are higher in carbohydrates include ones that provide dietary fiber and whole grains as well as those without added sugars.

There are two main types of carbohydrates:

–             Simple carbohydrates (less healthy)

–             Complex carbohydrates (more healthy)

What are simple carbohydrates?

Simple carbohydrates are digested quickly.  This is why they are used for quick energy.  The digestive enzymes easily break down these molecules for absorption.  Their rapid absorption increases the chances of sugar converting to fat .  Examples include white bread, white rice, refined sugars (white sugar, cookies, candy, jelly), most packaged cereals, pasta (white flour), sodas, soft drinks and chocolate.

What are complex carbohydrates?

Complex carbohydrates are harder to digest.  Digestive enzymes have to work much harder to break them down for absorption through the intestines.  For this reason digestion of complex carbohydrates takes longer. The slow absorption of these sugars provide us with a steady supply of energy and limits the amount of sugar converted into fat and stored.  Examples include whole grain bread, brown rice, unrefined sugars, (whole cane or raw sugar), oatmeal, potatoes, most fruits, corn and rice.

Try to replace simple carbohydrates with complex carbohydrates.

All carbs can contribute to weight gain and worsening control of diabetes, but eating simple carbohydrates make you much more prone. to this bad consequence.

What are fats?

Fats are nutrients that are water insoluble and supply the body with energy.  They are needed for important bodily functions.  However too much fat consumption can lead to poor control of diabetes and to the development of cardiovascular disease.  There are several types of fats:  polyunsaturated fats, monounsaturated fats, saturated fats and trans fats.

Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated ( the “good” fats).

Found in nut and vegetable oils and oily fish, such as salmon, trout, and herring. They don’t raise blood cholesterol levels and may even reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems. Eating seafood with omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon and sardines, twice a week may reduce the risk of certain forms of heart disease.

Saturated and trans fats (the “bad” fats)

Found in dairy and beef products and palm and coconut oils. The more of them you eat, the higher your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Trans fats are also found in French fries and many commercially baked products, such as cookies and crackers, but are becoming less common.

Examples of good oils:   Olive oil (best), Canola oil (next best), Peanut oil (good), Vegetable oil (least)

Examples of bad oils:  Coconut oil, Palm oil, All animal based oil such as lard and bacon grease.

Go to this link for morewww.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/

callout_mywellpannerExciting new lifestyle improvement program for people with type 2 diabetes

We know that making lifestyle changes can be overwhelming, but we are here to help.  My Well Planner is a FREE customized, online support program designed to help you make healthy lifestyle choices.

My Well Planner:mywellplanner

  • Helps you get motivated to eat healthier and stay active
  • Makes understanding diabetes easier with a variety of topics you can choose
  • Allows you to set health goals that you can achieve at your own pace
  • Provides you with tools for sharing your progress between appointments

*It’s important to work with your doctor when setting health goals.

With the My Well Planner Program, you can take small steps to reach your personal health goals in five areas:

  • Eating Better
  • Staying Active
  • Understanding Type 2 Diabetes
  • Sharing with Others
  • Taking Medications

Enroll today for your FREE personalized online program.

To learn more about My Well Planner, visit tradjenta.com/mywellplanner or click the link below to go ahead and register now!

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General Health

Herbal Medications

medicinal herbs and tablets on white background

Medicinal Herbs and Tablets

Want to go the “Natural” route?  Try these common Herbals?

Black Cohosh – A remedy for menopausal symptoms

Cranberry – Used for urinary infection prevention and treatment

Echinacea – Stimulates the body’s immune system, especially against the cold virus

Fish Oil – Reduces cholesterol; recommended for cardiovascular disease prevention and high blood pressure

Garlic –Reduces heart disease, lower cholesterol levels, and mildly lowers blood pressure; helps to prevent colds

Gingko – Improves brain function

Ginseng – Energy booster, stimulates the immune system, and increases body resistance to stress

Saw Palmetto – Treatment for enlarged prostate and general prostate health

St. John’s Wort – Used to treat depression, anxiety, and insomnia

Nutritional Counseling & Weight Loss Program

The Primary Care Specialists Nutritional Counseling & Weight Loss Program

Most of today’s chronic health challenges can be influenced by what we eat. Whether your goal is to lose weight, address a health concern such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, cholesterol, and heart disease… or simply live well, the Primary Care Specialists Nutrition Counseling and Weight Loss Program can help you! Primary Care Specialist’s nutrition and lifestyle coaches provide the education and support you need to change old habits and meet personal wellness goals.

“Studies show that dieters are more likely to lose weight and keep it off if they have contact with a weight-loss counselor” -New York Times

4 weeks, consisting of…

  • An initial individual assessment
  • Workshops each week.  (group sessions)
  • A class of 10-20 participants

1. In the initial individual session, our professionals will make an assessment of your individual health needs, evaluate your eating and lifestyle habits, then discuss generalized meal planning guidance and how to implement it. Each weekly session, our professionals will start off by obtaining weight measurements, waist measurements, and BMI calculations for each participant, followed up by a group session and work shop.

2. Each group session will have a 30 minute lecture on some aspect of weight management:

  • Health consequences of obesity
  • Weight loss tips
  • Understanding what makes us eat too much
  • Understanding calories
  • Understanding dietary fats
  • Reading and understanding food labels
  • Importance of exercise
  • How to reduce calories
  • Healthy grocery shopping
  • Understanding food choices
  • Eating out
  • Rules of healthy eating
  • Healthy, low calorie recipes / recipe modification
  • Choosing weight loss products

3. Following each lecture will be a group discussion and work shop lasting approximately 15-20 minutes concerning the lecture presentation. Group discussion will also include successful tips from the participants as well as their frustrations.

4. Lastly, there will be some type of exercise such as neighborhood walking, aerobics, etc., to teach and stress the importance of daily activity. The entire session each week is expected to last 60-90 minutes.

$30 per session (cost covered by most insurances)

YES! Each participant gets a goody bag full of items to help with you new healthy lifestyle. Some of the items will include various samples (such as the Hunger Shield appetite control drink mix), a pedometer, a calorie sheet of common foods, and various low calorie snacks from our sponsors.

Check us out in action! (below)